Workforce diversity - Indigenous Australians

Indigenous Australians are people of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent who identify and are accepted as such by the community in which they live. Estimates from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2011 ABS Census data indicated that 3.1 per cent of Western Australia’s population was Indigenous, with Indigenous Australians representing 2.8 per cent of those of the working age population (15-64).

Representation

As at 30 June 2012, the representation of Indigenous Australians employed in public sector agencies and authorities is 2.6 per cent which remained the same as 2011. The percentage of Indigenous Australians did not change in the public sector, but there has been an increase in the number employed in the sector from 2 533 employess in 2011 to 2 749 employees in 2012. The figure reflects an overall increase in the number of employees who identify as being an Indigenous Australian. The representation is lower than the representation of working age Indigenous Australians in the community (2.8 per cent) according to ABS data from 2011.

In local government authorities, the representation of Indigenous Australian outdoor workers in 2012 was 6.1 per cent (230 employees) remaining above representative levels in the community. Representation of Indigenous Australian indoor workers remains low at 1.8 per cent (172 employees).

In 2012 the percentage of Indigenous Australian public university academics remains unchanged at 1.2 per cent (75 employees). Representation of Indigenous Australian general staff in public universities decreased from 1.2 per cent (76 employees) in 2011 to 0.9 per cent (65 employees) in 2012.

Representation of Indigenous Australians in public authorities: 2008-2012

Representation of Indigenous Australians in public authorities: 2008-2012Note: The data for this diversity group relies upon self-nomination. It is therefore possible that the results underestimate the true percentages. In 2012 the reporting dates for local government authorities data changed from December to March in order to better match data reporting timeframes for public sector agencies and authorities and public universities. The change in reporting timeframes has resulted in an absence of local government data for the 2011 reporting year.

Distribution

The low workforce representation of Indigenous Australians in public authorities means that small changes in distribution can cause large fluctuations in equity index scores.

The equity index for Indigenous Australians in public sector agencies and authorities has increased from 39 in 2011 to 40 in 2012 and remains below the ideal equity index of 100.

The equity index for Indigenous Australian local government indoor workers decreased from 65 in 2010 to 61 in 2012. For outdoor workers, the equity index score also decreased from 93 in 2010 to 91 in 2012. The salary range for outdoor workers stops at level 6.

The equity index for Indigenous Australian university academics decreased from 76 in 2011 to 71 in 2012. Similarly for Indigenous Australian university general staff, the equity index decreased from 56 in 2011 to 51 in 2012.

Equity index for Indigenous Australians in public authorities: 2008-2012

Equity index for Indigenous Australians in public authorities: 2008-2012Note: In 2012 the reporting dates for local government authorities data changed from December to March in order to better match data reporting timeframes for public sector agencies and authorities and public universities. The change in reporting timeframes has resulted in an absence of local government data for the 2011 reporting year.

Employment type

For public sector agencies and authorities in 2012, permanency rates for Indigenous Australians are 70.5 per cent compared to 67.1 per cent for all employees.

Indigenous Australians are slightly more likely to work full-time when compared to all employees, with 55.8 per cent of permanent and fixed-term Indigenous Australians in public sector agencies and authorities working full-time in 2012, compared to 51.9 per cent for all employees.

In local government authorities in 2012, Indigenous Australians were less likely to work part-time, with 11.4 per cent of permanent and fixed-term Indigenous Australians being employed part-time in 2012, compared to 16.1 per cent for all employees.

In public universities, Indigenous Australians are less likely to be permanent (39.3 per cent) when compared to all employees (42.1 per cent) in 2012.

Indigenous Australians are also more likely to be part-time in public universities, with 21.4 per cent of permanent and fixed-term Indigenous Australians working part-time in 2012, compared to 18.7 per cent of all employees in 2012. Indigenous Australians are less likely to be in ‘other’ employment types (25 per cent) when compared to all employees (29.7 per cent) in public universities.

 

Public sector agencies and authorities

Local government authorities

Public universities

Employment type

IA

All employees

IA

All employees

IA

All employees

Permanent employees

70.5%

67.1%

64.9%

63.5%

39.3%

42.1%

Fixed-term employees

16.7%

15.4%

5.7%

7.2%

35.7%

28.2%

Full-time employees

55.8%

51.9%

59.2%

54.6%

53.6%

51.6%

Part-time employees

31.4%

30.6%

11.4%

16.1%

21.4%

18.7%

Other employment types (includes casual employees and trainees)

12.8%

17.5%

29.4%

29.3%

25.0%

29.7%

Note: Indigenous Australians (IA) refers to individuals who identify themselves as such and have responded to the voluntary diversity survey. Indigenous Australians are included in the ‘All employees’ category.

Distribution across salary ranges - public sector agencies and authorities

The number of Indigenous Australians in public sector agencies and authorities at salary ranges 7 to 10 has increased from 110 in 2011 to 129 in 2012. Overall, there is still a high concentration of this diversity group at lower salary ranges.

In 2012, of all Indigenous Australians in public sector agencies and authorities, 4.4 per cent are at salary ranges 7 to 10 and 0.5 per cent at salary ranges 9 to 10. This compares with 10.8 per cent and 3.3 per cent, respectively, for all employees. The representation of Indigenous Australians in salary ranges 9 and 10 has increased slightly from 0.4 per cent in 2011 to 0.5 per cent in 2012

Representation of Indigenous Australians in salary ranges 9 and 10 is still very low. This is of significant concern given that staff in these salary ranges are considered a pool for future appointments to the SES, as well as mentors and role models for Indigenous employees new to the public sector.

Distribution of Indigenous Australians across salary ranges in public sector agencies and authorities in 2012

Distribution of Indigenous Australians across salary ranges in public sector agencies and authorities in 2012

Public sector agencies and authorities: Indigenous Australians in salary ranges 9-10 from 2002-2012

Public sector agencies and authorities: Indigenous Australians in salary ranges 9-10 from 2002-2012


Page last updated 11 September 2014