Workforce diversity profile

The DEOPE analyses data on the representation 2 and distribution 3 of diversity groups in public authorities. This data allows the DEOPE to assess the effectiveness of public authority workforce and diversity plans.

In 2013, the DEOPE received data from:

  • 109 public sector entities (June 2013 data)
  • 140 local government authorities (March 2013 data)
  • four public universities (March 2013 data)
  • 21 other public authorities (June 2013 data).

Appendix B contains a list of all public authorities that reported during 2012/13 and an overview is provided in Figure 2. In 2012/13, there were 195 656 employees in these authorities.

Person signing a document

Figure 2: Figure 2: Public authorities reporting to the DEOPE in 2012/13

Figure 2: Public authorities reporting to the DEOPE in 2012/13 4

In 2013, the DEOPE worked with the Commission to review and amend the methods used for equity and diversity surveying and reporting. A revised methodology has been used to prepare the 2012/13 DEOPE annual report. Therefore, the results reported for previous years will differ in this report to previous reports due to the changes in methodology.

In previous years, the DEOPE has also reported on public sector entities and other public authorities as one combined group. These have now been split in the 2012/13 DEOPE annual report.

The data for Indigenous Australians, people with disability and people from culturally diverse backgrounds relies on self-nomination. Therefore, it is possible that this data underestimates the true numbers.

 

Representation

Tables 1 to 4 provide an overview of representation5 for the last five years, based on yearly reports to the DEOPE.

Women in management

Women in management refers to the representation of female employees in the top three management tiers, which includes the SES in public sector entities. The management tiers are linked to decision-making responsibility, rather than salary.

Table 1 shows that female employees held 29.2 per cent of SES positions within public sector entities in 2013. The proportion of women in tiers 2 and 3 of management increased in 2013 to 35.4 per cent and 42.0 per cent respectively, while women in tier 1 decreased to 26.2 per cent.

Table 2 highlights that the representation of local government women indoor workers in tier 1 positions increased to 8.6 per cent while tier 2 positions decreased to 32.1 per cent in 2013. The proportion of women outdoor workers in tier 2 positions decreased to 1.6 per cent while tier 3 positions increased to 11.0 per cent.

In public universities, there is one woman occupying a tier 1 position so the representation remained steady at 25.0 per cent in 2013 (Table 3). Tier 2 representation decreased to 33.3 per cent in 2013 for academic and general staff combined, however Tier 3 representation increased to 40.8 per cent.

Table 4 shows that the proportion of women in tier 1 and 2 positions within other public authorities increased in 2013 to 10.0 per cent and 19.1 per cent respectively, while women in tier 3 positions decreased to 19.5 per cent.

Indigenous Australians

Indigenous Australian employees are people of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent who identify as such, and are accepted as such by the community in which they live.

Based on June 2013 data, Table 1 shows that the representation of Indigenous Australian employees in public sector entities was 3.0 per cent, slightly lower than 2012. However, this is above the proportion of working age Indigenous Australians in the WA population 6 (2.8 per cent).

In local government authorities, the representation of Indigenous Australian indoor and outdoor workers remained relatively steady at 1.7 per cent and 6.3 per cent respectively (Table 2).

Table 3 indicates that the proportion of Indigenous Australian academic staff in public universities remained the same in 2013, at 1.2 per cent. However, the proportion of Indigenous Australian general staff increased slightly to 1.2 per cent.

Table 4 shows that the representation of Indigenous Australian employees in other public authorities remained relatively steady at 1.5 per cent in 2013.

People from culturally diverse backgrounds

Cultural diversity is measured by the number of employees born in countries other than those categorised as mainly English speaking countries (for example, Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States of America).

Table 1 shows that the representation of public sector entity employees from culturally diverse backgrounds decreased slightly in 2013 to 12.4 per cent.

For local government authorities, the representation of indoor and outdoor workers from culturally diverse backgrounds increased to 21.4 per cent and 17.6 per cent respectively in 2013 (Table 2).

Table 3 highlights that the proportion of academic staff in public universities from culturally diverse backgrounds increased in 2013 to 32.6 per cent. The representation of general staff also increased to 22.9 per cent.

Table 4 indicates that the representation of employees from culturally diverse backgrounds in other public authorities decreased to 13.5 per cent in 2013.

People with disability

Employees with disability include those employees that identify as having an employment restriction that requires adaptations such as ongoing assistance to carry out duties or specialised equipment.

The representation of employees with disability in public sector entities was 2.6 per cent in 2013 (Table 1). 7 This figure remains above the WA working age representation of people needing assistance with core activities 8 (1.9 per cent).

The representation of local government indoor and outdoor workers with disability remained relatively steady at 1.7 per cent and 2.9 per cent respectively in 2013 (Table 2).

Table 3 indicates that the proportion of academic staff with disability in public universities increased slightly in 2013 to 2.0 per cent. However, the proportion of general staff with disability remained relatively steady at 1.4 per cent.

The representation of employees with disability in other public authorities remained relatively steady at 1.6 per cent in 2013 (Table 4).

 

Youth and mature workers

Youth refers to employees under 25 years of age while mature workers are aged 45 years and over. Mature workers are over-represented in public employment compared with the broader community. Many public authorities are developing strategies to retain mature workers through flexible working arrangements to help with the transfer of corporate knowledge and skills to the younger workforce.

Table 1 shows that the representation of mature age workers in public sector entities remained steady in 2013 at 51.9 per cent. However, the proportion of youth decreased slightly to 5.1 per cent.

In local government authorities, youth representation for both indoor and outdoor workers increased in 2013 to 14.2 per cent and 7.0 per cent respectively. Similarly, the representation of mature workers increased to 37.5 per cent and 56.2 per cent respectively.

In public universities, youth representation for both academics and general staff increased in 2013 to 3.3 per cent and 8.3 per cent respectively. Similarly, the representation of mature academics increased to 40.4 per cent. However, the representation of mature general staff decreased to 35.0 per cent.

Table 4 shows that the representation of youth in other public authorities increased to 6.3 per cent in 2013, while the representation of mature workers decreased to 41.6 per cent.

Table 1: Public sector entity representation from 2009-2013

 

Representation (%)

Diversity group

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Women in management

         

- Senior executive service

25.1

26.7

26.4

27.6

29.2

• Tier 1

23.1

27.7

29.6

31.4

26.2

• Tier 2

38.3

36.9

35.6

33.7

35.4

• Tier 3

36.8

39.0

40.0

40.5

42.0

Indigenous Australians

2.7

2.9

3.1

3.3

3.0

People from culturally diverse backgrounds

13.7

13.1

13.1

12.7

12.4

People with disability 9

3.4

3.5

4.2

4.8

2.6

Youth

6.0

5.5

5.5

5.4

5.1

Mature workers

51.2

51.7

51.9

51.9

51.9

Table 2: Local government authority representation from 2008-2010 and 2012-2013

 

Representation (%)

Diversity group

2008

2009

2010

2012

2013

Women in management

Tier 1 (indoor workers)

9.9

7.1

7.8

7.9

8.6

Tier 1 (outdoor workers)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Tier 2 (indoor workers)

26.4

29.1

28.3

34.2

32.1

Tier 2 (outdoor workers)

14.0

1.9

13.4

6.9

1.6

Tier 3 (indoor workers)

34.5

33.7

39.1

38.0

37.2

Tier 3 (outdoor workers)

9.1

3.8

11.5

9.3

11.0

Indigenous Australians

Indoor workers

1.5

1.6

1.4

1.8

1.7

Outdoor workers

7.9

7.1

6.4

6.1

6.3

People from culturally diverse backgrounds

Indoor workers

13.4

13.4

14.6

19.6

21.4

Outdoor workers

12.6

13.8

11.4

16.0

17.6

People with disability

Indoor workers

2.1

1.9

1.8

1.7

1.7

Outdoor workers

4.4

4.5

3.3

3.1

2.9

Youth

Indoor workers

16.1

15.3

15.0

11.4

14.2

Outdoor workers

7.5

8.7

10.1

6.4

7.0

Mature workers

Indoor workers

33.8

37.1

38.7

37.2

37.5

Outdoor workers

51.4

50.3

56.6

53.3

56.2

Note: For 2011, the reporting date for local government authorities was changed from December 2011 to March 2012 in order to better match other reporting timeframes. This change resulted in no local government authority data for the 2011 reporting year.

Table 3: Public university representation from 2009-2013

 

Representation (%)

Diversity group

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Women in management (academic and general staff)

Tier 1

25.0

25.0

25.0

25.0

25.0

Tier 2

33.3

37.5

40.0

39.1

33.3

Tier 3

36.1

36.0

41.4

36.4

40.8

Indigenous Australians

Academic staff

1.1

1.2

1.3

1.2

1.2

General staff

1.1

1.2

1.2

0.9

1.2

People from culturally diverse backgrounds

Academic staff

21.4

22.8

25.4

25.7

32.6

General staff

18.7

18.8

19.9

19.7

22.9

People with disability

Academic staff

1.5

1.4

1.9

1.7

2.0

General staff

1.8

1.5

1.7

1.3

1.4

Youth

Academic staff

2.2

2.4

4.1

2.4

3.3

General staff

8.8

8.1

9.6

8.0

8.3

Mature workers

Academic staff

41.7

42.0

46.1

39.3

40.4

General staff

31.4

30.9

33.1

37.0

35.0

Table 4: Other public authority representation from 2009-2013

 

Representation (%)

Diversity group

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Women in management

         

• Tier 1

10.5

10.5

10.5

5.3

10.0

• Tier 2

20.8

16.0

16.1

18.3

19.1

• Tier 3

18.8

19.3

21.1

20.7

19.5

Indigenous Australians

1.0

1.1

1.1

1.4

1.5

People from culturally diverse backgrounds

20.1

16.0

17.8

19.6

13.5

People with disability

1.7

1.7

1.5

1.5

1.6

Youth

8.0

6.8

6.1

5.6

6.3

Mature workers

45.6

45.8

46.8

45.3

41.6

Distribution

Tables 5 to 8 provide an overview of distribution 10 for the last five years, based on yearly reports to the DEOPE.

For youth and mature workers, distribution is not available because salary levels closely correlate with age and experience.

The ideal distribution is 100, with a score of less than 100 indicating that a diversity group is concentrated at the lower salary levels.

Women

Table 5 shows that the distribution of female employees in public sector entities in 2013 remained relatively steady at 71. However, this is below the ideal score of 100.

For female local government indoor and outdoor workers, the distribution remained relatively steady at 81 and 88 respectively (Table 6).

Table 7 indicates that in public universities, the distribution of female academics and general staff remained relatively unchanged in 2013 at 72 and 84 respectively.

Table 8 shows that the distribution of female employees in other public authorities remained relatively steady at 65 in 2013.

Indigenous Australians

The low representation of Indigenous Australians in public authorities means that movements across salary levels can cause large changes in distribution scores.

Table 5 highlights that the distribution for Indigenous Australian employees in public sector entities increased to 39 in 2013. However, this is below the ideal score of 100.

For local government indoor and outdoor workers, the Indigenous Australian distribution remained relatively steady at 60 and 90 respectively in 2013 (Table 6).

In public universities, the distribution of Indigenous Australian academics and general staff increased to 85 and 61 respectively in 2013 (Table 7).

Table 8 shows the distribution for Indigenous Australian employees in other public authorities remained relatively unchanged at 49 in 2013.

 

People from culturally diverse backgrounds

The distribution of employees from culturally diverse backgrounds in public sector entities remained steady at 96 in 2013 (Table 5).

Table 6 indicates that in 2013 the distribution of local government indoor workers from culturally diverse backgrounds decreased to 112 while outdoor workers remained relatively steady at 109.

In public universities, the distribution of academic and general staff from culturally diverse backgrounds remained relatively steady at 87 and 95 in 2013 (Table 7).

The distribution of employees from culturally diverse backgrounds in other public authorities increased to 153 in 2013 (Table 8).

People with disability

The distribution of employees with disability in public sector entities was 87 in 2013 (Table 5). 11

Table 6 shows that the distribution of local government indoor and outdoor workers with disability remained relatively steady at 78 and 81 respectively in 2013.

The distribution of public university academics with disability increased to 101 in 2013 (Table 7). However, the distribution of general staff with disability remained steady at 76.

The distribution of employees with disability in other public authorities decreased to 87 in 2013 (Table 8).

Table 5: Public sector entity distribution from 2009-2013

 

Distribution (equity index)

Diversity group

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Women

64

67

69

69

71

Indigenous Australians

53

41

36

35

39

People from culturally diverse backgrounds

98

97

93

96

96

People with disability12

98

95

95

100

87

 

Table 6: Local government authority distribution from 2008-2010 and 2012-2013

   

Distribution (equity index)

Diversity group

 

2008

2009

2010

2012

2013

Women

Indoor workers

76

80

83

79

81

Outdoor workers

104

96

92

87

88

Indigenous Australians

Indoor workers

52

62

65

61

60

Outdoor workers

98

91

93

91

90

People from culturally diverse backgrounds

Indoor workers

112

110

108

116

112

Outdoor workers

102

102

103

108

109

People with disability

Indoor workers

72

77

74

77

78

Outdoor workers

86

84

91

83

81

Note: For 2011, the reporting date for local government authorities was changed from December 2011 to March 2012 in order to better match other reporting timeframes. This change resulted in no local government authority data for the 2011 reporting year.

Table 7: Public university distribution from 2009-2013

   

Distribution (equity index)

Diversity group

 

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Women

Academic staff

68

69

70

71

72

General staff

80

81

82

83

84

Indigenous Australians

Academic staff

59

76

76

71

85

General staff

58

53

56

51

61

People from culturally diverse backgrounds

Academic staff

88

86

88

88

87

General staff

95

93

92

93

95

People with disability

Academic staff

105

108

104

97

101

General staff

76

72

77

76

76

Table 8: Other public authority distribution from 2009-2013 13

 

Distribution (equity index)

Diversity group

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Women

69

77

65

66

65

Indigenous Australians

51

52

46

51

49

People from culturally diverse backgrounds

136

154

159

142

153

People with disability

133

136

86

91

87

2 Representation is the number of employees who self-identify as belonging to a diversity group, expressed as a proportion of the number of valid responses to a voluntary diversity questionnaire managed by public authorities.

3 Distribution is determined using the equity index. The equity index measures the distribution of each diversity group across salary levels. The ideal equity index is 100, with an index of less than 100 indicating that a diversity group is concentrated at the lower salary levels.

4 Please note the decrease in the 2012/13 headcount figures is largely due to a change in methodology to improve the quality of reporting. In previous years, casual employees who had been paid at any time in the financial year were included. This year, only casual staff who were paid in June 2013 were included.

5 Representation is the number of employees who self-identify as belonging to a diversity group, expressed as a proportion of the number of valid responses to a voluntary diversity questionnaire managed by public authorities.

6 Australian Bureau of Statistics 2012, 2011 Census of population and housing.

7 In 2013, the Department of Health identified a significant over-reporting error for employees with disability. This means that the figures for 2009 to 2012, as reported in Tables 1 and 5, reflect an over-representation of people with disability in public sector entities.

8 Australian Bureau of Statistics 2012, 2011 Census of population and housing.

9 In 2013, the Department of Health identified a significant over-reporting error for employees with disability. This means that the figures for 2009 to 2012, as reported in Tables 1 and 5, reflect an over-representation of people with disability in public sector entities.

10 Distribution is determined using the equity index. The equity index measures the distribution of each diversity group across salary levels.

11 In 2013, the Department of Health identified a significant over-reporting error for employees with disability. This means that the figures for 2009 to 2012, as reported in Tables 1 and 5, reflect an over-representation of people with disability in public sector entities.

12 ibid.

13 In 2013, 21 other public authorities were surveyed and inform the distribution results. Please note when comparing with previous results, that a smaller sample of other public authorities were surveyed in previous years.

 


Page last updated 11 September 2014