Profile of the Commission

Although we are an independent statutory office, we are of the view that independence doesn’t mean operating in isolation of the government of the day. By working together to achieve our priorities and continuing to build relationships with our stakeholders, we can achieve our vision of a high performing public sector. This vision underpins our purpose at the Commission to enhance the integrity, effectiveness and efficiency of public administration and management.

To achieve this objective, we have identified the following four strategic priorities outlined in our Strategic Plan 2014-17 to:

  • increase efficiency, flexibility and integrity
  • provide and support governance and leadership
  • build an accountable, knowledgeable and diverse workforce
  • promote openness and transparency in evaluation and reporting.

Through our strategic priorities, we assist the public sector in achieving its broad goal of a greater focus on achieving results in key service areas for the benefit of all Western Australians.

Our values

We commit to being:

  • responsive and professional in our service delivery
  • accountable in what we do
  • forward thinking in our delivery
  • collaborative in our relationships.

Enabling and administering legislation

The Commissioner is an independent statutory officer, established under the Public Sector Management Act 1994 (PSM Act). He is supported in his functions by the Commission, a department established under the PSM Act. The Commissioner is responsible for setting and monitoring public sector standards and codes of ethics, and for the promotion of effectiveness and efficiency within the public sector.

In addition to administering the PSM Act, the Commission also administers the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2003.

The Office of the Director of Equal Opportunity in Public Employment also resides within the Commission and administers Part IX of the Equal Opportunity Act 1984. The Commissioner reports directly to the Parliament of Western Australia on matters within the director’s jurisdiction.

Government affiliated bodies

The Salaries and Allowances Tribunal (SAT) has been determined by the Treasurer to be an affiliated body of the Commission in accordance with section 60(1)(b) of the Financial Management Act 2006. The Tribunal’s report appears immediately following the Commission’s report.

Responsible minister

The responsible minister is the Hon. Colin Barnett MEc MLA, Premier; Minister for State Development; Science.

Corporate executive

Mal Wauchope, Public Sector Commissioner

Mal leads and positions the Commission as an independent statutory authority, balancing his policy, assistance and oversight roles.

Fiona Roche, Deputy Commissioner, Accountability, Policy and Performance

Fiona is responsible for managing the Commissioner’s statutory responsibilities in relation to reviews and investigations, policy and reform and reporting to Parliament.

Dan Volaric, Deputy Commissioner, Agency Support

Dan provides high level advice and support to ministerial offices, chief executive officers and agency staff on a range of public sector administration and management matters.

Jo Harrison-Ward, Management Consultant, Centre for Public Sector Excellence

Jo leads the Centre for Public Sector Excellence in developing the capability and capacity of public sector leaders and practitioners.

Rebecca Harris, Director, Office of the Commissioner

Rebecca is responsible for delivering the Commissioner’s strategic initiatives in relation to statutory responsibilities and strategic priorities.

Ruth Young, Director, Corporate Services

Ruth provides direction and support to the corporate, communications and information technology services across the Commission.

Amanda Alderson, Chief Finance Officer

Amanda provides costing, financial and management reporting services across the Commission.

Rachel Mayhew, A/Manager, Human Resource Strategy and Support

Rachel delivers organisational and employee relations advice to management and employees across the Commission.

Organisational structure as at 30 June 2014

Organisational structure as at 30 June 2014

Corporate executiveMembers of the corporate executive, from top left: Ms Rebecca Harris, Ms Rachel Mayhew, Ms Amanda Alderson, Ms Ruth Young. Front: Ms Jo Harrison-Ward, Mr Dan Volaric, Mr Mal Wauchope, Ms Fiona Roche

Staff profile

As at 30 June 2014, the Commission comprised 167 employees (headcount) which equals 131 full-time equivalents (FTE). While the Department of Treasury now requires public sector entities to meet a salaries cap rather than an FTE ceiling, the Commission still reports on its FTE to the Department of Treasury. Our previous FTE ceiling was 146 in 2012/13.

Employment status (by headcount)

2013/14

2012/13

2011/12

2010/11

Permanent

123

133

134

115

Fixed-term

18

15

21

37

Trainees

26

29

32

3

Total

167

177

187

155

Employment status (permanent/fixed term)

2013/14

2012/13

2011/12

2010/11

Full time

141

141

161

119

Part time

26

36

26

36

Full time equivalents (and ceiling)

131 (146)

134 (146)

144 (151)

136 (153)

Gender (by headcount)

2013/14

2012/13

2011/12

2010/11

Females

102

113

122

96

Males

65

64

65

59

Workforce at a glance

We believe flexibility is key for an inclusive and diverse workforce and provide opportunities for 26 officers to work part-time.

We take pride that our workforce is representative of the wider WA community comprising:

  • 21 per cent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, which is higher than the public sector average of three per cent
  • 41.7 per cent women in the corporate executive team, which is similar to the public sector average of 42 per cent
  • 12.4 per cent from culturally diverse backgrounds, which is the same as the public sector average
  • 21 per cent youth, which is significantly higher than the public sector average of
    5.1 per cent
  • 3.5 per cent people with a disability, which is higher than the public sector average of
    2.6 per cent.

Substantive equality

You will note from this snapshot that we are committed to substantive equality which seeks to eliminate systemic, direct and indirect discrimination.

Disability access and inclusion plan outcomes

Disability Services Act 1993, section 29

Through our Disability access and inclusion plan 2010–2015 we demonstrated our commitment to implementing a range of strategies that aim to improve access and inclusion for people with disabilities to our services, facilities and information. These strategies have been successful in providing people with disabilities the same opportunities, rights and responsibilities enjoyed by others in the community. Our staff has also been provided with the opportunity to increase their understanding of diversity principles through ongoing professional learning.

Professional development

In 2013/14, we expanded our investment in capability development by targeting those areas identified of greatest need including strategic human resource leadership, information and communications technology management and legal and investigations training.

In 2014, we held three successful Administrative Law workshops facilitated by Professor Phil Evans, former Dean of the School of Law at Murdoch University and Director of the Western Australian Institute of Dispute Management. Over 50 staff attended the workshops which provided participants with an understanding of the principles and application of administrative law. In response to the need to build knowledge and skills in conducting workplace investigations, we also provided ten staff with the opportunity to undertake a Certificate IV in Government (Investigations) through the International Academy of Law Enforcement and Security (IALES).

Personal development

As part of our commitment to supporting the health and wellbeing of our staff, we provided a number of wellness initiatives. Some of the initiatives on offer included complimentary health assessments, influenza vaccinations and corporate health fund discounts, as well as the opportunity to undertake mental health first aid and disability awareness training. Additionally, 80 staff took up the opportunity to participate in the ‘10 000 steps Australia’ walking challenge.

Our future leaders

In January 2014, two university graduates joined the Commission to undertake a 12-month graduate development program. Through rotations across the Commission, our graduates are exposed to a range of experiences while working on a number of key strategic projects. Each graduate is also provided with professional development opportunities, including the ‘Graduate future leaders program’.

We value the contribution trainees make in the workplace and this year, two school-based trainees commenced employment with the Commission. While at the Commission, all trainees undertake a Certificate I, II and III in Government and have the prospect of transitioning to permanent positions either during or after their recognised training program.

In addition, as part of the Aboriginal employment strategy 2011–15, we have been pleased to facilitate the recruitment and secondment of 46 full-time Aboriginal trainees in a number of public sector agencies.

We will continue to build upon our commitment to youth employment in the public sector by ensuring these programs remain accessible, innovative and forward thinking.

Employee engagement and stakeholder satisfaction

We believe employees who are engaged with their job and committed to their organisation are generally more productive as they are motivated to work with the success of the organisation in mind. The results from the employee perception survey revealed 85 per cent of our employees are satisfied with their job and 88 per cent are happy with the Commission as an employer.

Monitoring customer satisfaction is an important element of evaluation programs and continuous improvement in general. Last year, the Queensland Government undertook a whole-of government service delivery satisfaction survey which identified WA to have the highest level of satisfaction across all levels of government (Queensland Government, March 2013, Whole-of-government service delivery research: Summary of outcomes). In addition, results from the Commission’s annual agency survey found 92 per cent of entities monitored service satisfaction. In further recognition of our achievements, 98 per cent of our key stakeholders agreed or strongly agreed that Commission staff are approachable and courteous.

Staff undertaking professional developmentProfessional development sessions for staff held in the Martin Jull Professional Development Centre

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Performance management framework

Outcome-based management framework

The following table illustrates the relationship between our services and desired outcomes, and the Government goal to which we contribute.

Government goal

Desired outcome

Services

Greater focus on achieving results in key service areas for the benefit of all Western Australians.

An efficient and effective public sector that operates with integrity.

  • Public sector leadership
  • Assistance and support
  • Oversight and reporting

The key performance indicators are measured in terms of both effectiveness and efficiency. Effectiveness indicators provide information to assist with the assessment of the extent to which government desired outcomes have been achieved through the resourcing and delivery of services to the community. Efficiency indicators monitor the relationship between the service delivered and the resources used to produce the service.

Desired outcomes

Effectiveness indicators

Services provided

Efficiency indicators

An efficient and effective public sector that operates with integrity

  • The portion of core clients who indicate the Commission has delivered policy, assistance and oversight that has assisted them to enhance integrity within their agencies.(a)
  • The portion of core clients who indicate the Commission has delivered policy, assistance and oversight that has assisted them to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of their agencies.(b)
  • The portion of core clients who indicate that assistance provided by the Commission has helped them to meet their statutory obligations under the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2003 (PID Act).(c)
  • The portion of core clients who indicate assistance provided by the Commission has helped them to meet their statutory obligations under Part IX of the Equal Opportunity Act 1984 (EO Act).(d)

Public sector leadership

  • Average cost per hour addressing legislative and policy development.

Assistance and support

  • Average cost per hour of assistance and support provided.
  • Average cost per workforce and diversity program, product or training hour.
  • Average cost per public administration, standards and integrity program, product or training hour.
  • Average cost per leadership development product, program and training hour.

Oversight and reporting

  • Average cost per hour of performance and oversight activity.
  • Percentage of oversight actions completed within target timeframes.

(a) This indicator measures the Commission’s capability at enhancing integrity in agencies through the minimum requirements of the principles of merit, equity, probity, integrity in official conduct, ethical codes and human resource management. Data for this measure was collected from the client perception survey.

(b) This indicator measures the Commission’s capacity at enhancing effectiveness and efficiency of public administration and management in agencies through legislative reform, the accountability framework, policies, advisory services and professional development. Data for this measure was collected from the client perception survey.

(c) This indicator measures how the Commissioner is increasing the understanding of issues related to compliance with the PID Act by public authorities through advisory services, product delivery and professional development. Data for this measure was collected from client perception survey.

(d) This indicator measures how the Commissioner is increasing the understanding of issues related to compliance with Part IX of the EO Act by public authorities through advisory services, product delivery and professional development. Data for this measure was collected from the client perception survey.

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Page last updated 30 September 2014